Archive for September, 2008

Signif moments of the Internet

Read about it – a long article from Cnet UK about the 50 most significant moments of Internet history. I’m no techie and I don’t think this is a definitive piece, but hey, at least someone tried to compile a whole lot of information into one place, even if they had a selective criteria.

What I found scary was that there were readers who wouldn’t read a web article if it required page-turning. Would you do that, not read something because it looked too long?

September 29, 2008 at 11:46 am Leave a comment

Wee interview

Ulla Kelly invited me to add my coming out experience to her survey.

You can read my answers here.

If you like, you too can Do The Interview by filling out an online form or send Ulla an email with your answers.

September 29, 2008 at 11:33 am 2 comments

Rock of ages

Older than the Gods – a 4.28 billion, yes Billion, year old bunch of rocks were ascertained in an ancient bedrock site along the eastern shore of Hudson Bay in northern Quebec, Canada. Like wow, eh? It took the Uni seven years to confirm the sample’s age.

If anyone reading this just happens to be at the Nuwuagittuq greenstone belt, could you snag me a piece, if it’s not illegal? Pretty please?

Watch out for the polar bears.

September 26, 2008 at 2:48 pm 2 comments

Where are the gay seniors?

Gay oldies? That goes against nearly every media stereotype of how fabulous we are; being trendy, well-groomed, brand conscious and YOUNG, therefore forever beautiful. Gay people don’t age, they just disappear into faerieland, don’t they?

This article from Newsweek (thanks, Anni) pays lip service to the presence of our senior members. I’m sorry but this line just burns me, “The good news, of course, is that attitudes are changing.”

Whose attitude? The government, legislation, the LGBT community, the senior population … who? And what are we doing about it?

I have very dear gay and lesbian and transgendered friends who are in or approaching their senior years. When I talk to them about being out – for those who aren’t –  I get basically two responses: they’d rather stay in with their families as they are treated as respected elders, or they withdraw from the gay community because they feel invisible. This is a loss to LGBT society that needs its elders and needs to remember those that were activists before Gen Y was born.

Frankly, there are issues that affect mature LGBT more severely than the rest of us working adults – health care, succession, pensions and benefits, taxes and more. Some may have an easier time working out legalities because of generic public policies. Others will have no chance of having their partnerships recognised, of receiving fair treatment in hospitals, or getting tax breaks, of not worrying about their kin vs their partner, of being questioned about their resident status, of losing their pensions and their jobs, of surviving.

Between a spineless government and an apathetic community, what can they do?

Ageism is a real issue for the LGBTQ world – young or old, within and without.

By the way, I’m not ignoring the needs of LGBTQ youth. That’s another issue worth pursuing. Suffice to say that I love meeting young women who are as alternative as all get out.

As I write this, there is a bill going through the New South Wales Parliament seeking to repeal or redress the 58 laws and regulations that still discriminate against us. New South Wales is home to the largest gay and lesbian population in Australia. We have the largest pride celebration in the southern hemisphere – Mardi Gras in February brings in millions of dollars revenue for the state, not to mention the constant club circuit. We spend our pink dollars on travel and entertainment by the bucketloads. We vote, we organise, we party.

The bill has just passed the lower House.

Links to link resources for mature aged lesbians and gays:

http://www.olderdykes.org/

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~jamms/

http://www.sageusa.org/index.cfm

http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lawlink/adb/ll_adb.nsf/pages/adb_glbti_consultation

Oh dear, not enough sites for lesbians, again.

September 24, 2008 at 4:33 pm 11 comments

Run, pig, run

It’s a well-known fact, if you’ve visited my home that is, that I am a pig/porcus fan. It all started in 1971, the year of my birth [cue music] which, in the Chinese Animal Zodiac, is the Year of the Pig. My life’s been predictable from then.

One of my hobbies is collecting pig figurines, and news items such as this:

Monster Pig holds woman hostage

He’s not that big for full grown male pig, really. And the poor guy can’t help being hot with the weather we’ve been having lately.

Edited to add update on Bruce. He’s in love with Ms Hayes.

ETA: No, he’s just hungry. Pics of Bruce before capture. He was found with an infected eye and scratches on his back. Ms Hayes fixed him up.

September 23, 2008 at 2:05 pm Leave a comment

THIS is print-on-demand

The Espresso Book Machine could revolutionize bookstores – large and small – and I predict possibly become a home office accessory in a few years.

It seems we have one in retail in Aust. … hmm which book should I request?

http://www.smh.com.au/news/entertainment/books/readers-cash-in-as-atm-for-books-boosts-withdrawals/2008/09/18/1221331045397.html

September 22, 2008 at 12:39 pm Leave a comment

The spice is right

Foodie spot of the week goes to Harissa, a North African spice paste that can be used as a condiment, marinade, topping, stir-through or ingredient, for just about anything.

Harissa is spicy in taste as well as heat. Adjust these ingredients to your liking.

The basic paste is made with:

  • Red chillies (fairly hot ones, remove seeds to de-intensify)
  • Garlic
  • Ground fresh roasted cumin seeds and coriander seeds.
  • Salt
  • Lots of olive oil

Some recipes add caraway seeds. Some start with red capsicum (smoked, peeled and deseeded, or a puree). For a bit of freshness, add finely chopped coriander or curry leaves.

To make a green Harissa paste, swap red for green capsicum, likewise the chillies, and add chopped parsley.

Blitz ingredients together, adding more oil if necessary. The oil seals the paste for longer storage, the paste can then be kept for ages.

Harissa is excellent as a meat rub, it can also be used like pesto in pasta or spread on bread, and to finish off soups or in stews. It can be cooked with meat, veg and fish. It is a gutsy condiment.

One of my favourite ways to use Harissa is to spoon it on a fillet of white fish, add a chopped herb and cherry tomatoes, some oil, tiny splash of white wine (optional), and wrap all in a foil packet. Cook in the oven, pan or on the BBQ for a few minutes. Voila!

Harissa is as versatile as chermoula, although the latter is usually made and used fresh.

September 21, 2008 at 12:45 am Leave a comment

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Evecho’s newsy bits

News, updates and links from the lesbian and publishing ‘verse that interest me, my current projects, keeping up with authors and sharing musings on middle-class life, gourmet adventures and comparisons between East/West perspectives. My opinions will likely be linearly logical and gayly bent, as they tend to be.